Breathing Training to Improve Human Performance at High Altitude

Learn more about:
Related Clinical Trial
Effect of Acetazolamide on Sleep Disordered Breathing in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Effects of Melatonin on Sleep, Ventilatory Control and Cognition at Altitude. Effect of Acetazolamide on Lung Water Content by Ultrasound in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Effect of Acetazolamide on Right Heart Function During Exercise in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Effect of Acetazolamide on Visuo-motor Learning in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Effect of Acetazolamide on Maximal Exercise Performance in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Physiological Adaptations to Simulated Intermittent Altitude on Human Health and Performance Iron Status and Cardiopulmonary Physiology Effect of Acetazolamide on Right Heart Function at Rest in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude. Effect of Acetazolamide on Postural Control in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years at Altitude Monitoring of the Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation and Perfusion in the Adapting Climber During Sleep in High Altitude The Psychophysiological Effect of Simulated and Terrestrial Altitude Relationship Between Succinate Dehydrogenase Mutations and High-Altitude Illness Cardio-respiratory Responses During Hypoxic Exercise in Individuals Born Prematurely Gut-microbiota Targeted Nutritional Intervention for Gut Barrier Integrity at High Altitude AZ, MZ, and the Pulmonary System Response to Hypoxia Study of the Effects of Iron Levels on the Lungs at High Altitude Effects of Aircraft Cabin Altitude on Passenger Comfort and Discomfort Three New Ideas to Protect Special Forces From the Stress of High Altitude Breathing Training to Improve Human Performance at High Altitude Oxidative Stress in Hypobaric Hypoxia Safety Evaluation of Aminophylline and Methazolamide Decompression Tables for Diving at Altitude Chronic Mountain Sickness, Systemic Vascular Function Evaluation of the Prevention and Treatment Effects of Chinese Medicine on High Altitude Illness Inhaled Budesonide for Altitude Illness Prevention Sickness Evaluation at Altitude With Acetazolamide at Relative Doses Prevention of Altitude Illness With Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Study (PAINS) Spectroscopic and Diffusion Weighted Analysis of the Effects of Dexamethasone on High Altitude Cerebral Oedema (HACE) Drug Combination on Exercise Performance at High Altitude Acclimatization Mechanisms During Ascent to 7500m Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness by Intermittent Hypoxia Sickness Evaluation at Altitude With Acetazolamide at Relative Dosages Study Looking at End Expiratory Pressure for Altitude Illness Decrease (SLEEP-AID) Can Rhodiola Crenulata Intake Improve Oxygen Saturation and Decrease the Incidence of Acute Mountain Sickness Comparison of Metoclopramide and Ibuprofen for the Treatment of Acute Mountain Sickness A Trial of Acetazolamide Versus Placebo in Preventing Mountain Sickness During Rapid Ascent Training in Hypoxia to Prevent Acute Mountain Sickness Study of Compound Danshen Dripping Pills to Treat Acute Mountain Sickness Altitude Sickness Prevention With Ibuprofen Relative to Acetazolamide and Treatment Efficacy Controlled Hyperventilation as Prophylaxis for Acute Mountain Sickness Inhaled Budesonide and Acute Mountain Sickness Altitude Sickness Prevention and Efficacy of Comparative Treatments Alternative Treatments in Acute Mountain Sickness Effect of Acetazolamide on Acute Mountain Sickness in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years Safety and Efficacy of T89 in Prevention and Treatment of Adults With Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS)

Brief Title

Breathing Training to Improve Human Performance at High Altitude

Official Title

Breathing Training to Improve Human Performance at High Altitude

Brief Summary

      Individuals traveling to altitudes above 8,000 feet may suffer from impaired exercise and
      cognitive performance, and acute mountain sickness (AMS). Decreased barometric pressure,
      which leads to low blood oxygen levels, is the primary cause of these disorders. Symptoms of
      AMS are characterized by headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fatigue, and difficulty
      sleeping. The goal of this research is to identify whether Respiratory Muscle Training will
      improve physical and cognitive performance, and reduce the symptoms of AMS, at simulated high
      altitude.
    



Study Type

Interventional


Primary Outcome

Change in exercise performance during acute simulated high-altitude exposure as measured by a peak oxygen uptake test and time to complete a 720kJ (40km) time trial on a Velotron cycle ergometer.


Condition

Mountain Sickness Acute

Intervention

Respiratory Muscle Training

Study Arms / Comparison Groups

 Respiratory Muscle Training
Description:  

Publications

* Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by National Clinical Trials Identifier (NCT ID) in Medline.

Recruitment Information


Recruitment Status

Device

Estimated Enrollment

100

Start Date

August 9, 2018

Completion Date

May 1, 2021

Primary Completion Date

April 1, 2019

Eligibility Criteria

        Inclusion Criteria:

          -  Healthy

          -  Men, ages 18-45 who are able to achieve at least 3.5 watts/kg of body weight during
             the peak oxygen uptake test

        Exclusion Criteria:

          -  Less than 18 years old

          -  Greater than 45 years old

          -  Have a body mass index greater than or equal to 30

          -  Have been recent smokers (tobacco or e-cigarettes)

          -  Current recreational or medical marijuana users

          -  Currently taking any medication (over-the-counter or prescription) or herbal
             supplements

          -  Participants who are unable to tolerate drinking only two, 6-ounce caffeinated
             beverages per day of the study

          -  Participants who are legally blind

          -  Participants who have been to altitudes above Denver (1609m or 5280ft), including air
             travel, in the 3 weeks prior to the start of the study or with plans to do so during
             the study

          -  Participants who have suffered a significant head injury, have anemia or sickle cell
             trait or disease, have active peptic ulcer disease, diabetes, hypertension, heart
             disease, HIV/AIDS, glaucoma, kidney disease, liver disease/cirrhosis, adrenal gland
             failure, hyponatremia/hypokalemia, tuberculosis

          -  Participants who have a current herpes infection or any other current type of viral or
             bacterial infection

          -  Participants with seizure disorders or history of migraines
      

Gender

Male

Ages

18 Years - 45 Years

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Contacts

Robert Roach, PhD, 303-724-1671, [email protected]

Location Countries

United States

Location Countries

United States

Administrative Informations


NCT ID

NCT03530163

Organization ID

18-0464


Responsible Party

Sponsor

Study Sponsor

University of Colorado, Denver

Collaborators

 United States Department of Defense

Study Sponsor

Robert Roach, PhD, Principal Investigator, Director, Altitude Research Center


Verification Date

June 2020