Rilonacept for Treatment of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF)

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Brief Title

Rilonacept for Treatment of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF)

Official Title

Phase 2 Study of IL-1 Trap (Rilonacept) for Treatment of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF)

Brief Summary

      Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetic disease resulting in recurrent attacks of
      fever, abdominal pain, chest pain, arthritis and rash. There are 5-15% of patients who
      continue to have FMF attacks despite treatment with colchicine or who cannot tolerate
      colchicine. Currently there are no alternatives to colchicine. Pyrin, the protein that has a
      defect in FMF has an important role in the regulation of a molecule called interleukin (IL)-1
      beta production and activity. This molecule is very important in the process of inflammation
      in FMF.

      Therefore we propose to use IL-1 Trap (Rilonacept), a medication that binds and neutralizes
      IL-1.

      We will enroll in this study 17 subjects from the age of 4 years, including adults with
      active FMF despite colchicine therapy. Subjects will receive in random order two 3-month
      courses of Rilonacept at 2.2 mg/kg (maximum 160 mg) by weekly subcutaneous injection and two
      3-month courses of placebo injection. If patients have at least two FMF attacks during a
      treatment course they will be able to get if they choose the other treatment until the end of
      that treatment course. Our hypothesis is that Rilonacept will decrease the number of acute
      FMF attacks and will be safe to use. This study may confirm the importance of IL-1 in the
      cause of FMF.

      Funding source - FDA Office of Orphan Products Development
    

Detailed Description

      Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory genetic
      disorder resulting in recurrent attacks of fever, serositis, arthritis and rash. Late
      complications of untreated FMF include the development of renal amyloidosis. FMF is a rare
      orphan disease in the United States. Treatment with colchicine is effective in reducing the
      frequency of episodes in most patients and the development of amyloidosis in nearly all
      patients. However, there are still 5-15% of patients who continue to have acute FMF attacks
      despite colchicine therapy or are intolerant of colchicine, usually from gastrointestinal
      adverse effects. Currently there are no effective alternatives to colchicine. Pyrin, the
      mutated protein in FMF has an important role in the regulation of IL-1 beta production and
      activity. Mutations in pyrin result in increased IL-1 beta levels in mice and humans. IL-1
      beta is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. Thus, we hypothesize that inhibition of IL-1
      will decrease acute attacks in patients with FMF. We propose to use IL-1 Trap (Rilonacept), a
      fusion protein consisting of human IL-1 cytokine receptor extracellular domains and the FC
      portion of human IgG1 that binds and neutralizes IL-1.

      We will enroll 17 subjects from the age of 4 years, including adults, from multiple centers
      in the United States with active FMF (at least 1 attack per month) despite receiving at least
      1.2-1.5 mg/d of colchicine (dose dependent on age) or are intolerant of colchicine. Subjects
      will be diagnosed by clinical criteria with at least one heterozygote mutation of the MEFV
      (pyrin) gene. After screening subjects will be monitored for a month to observe for acute FMF
      attacks or if they did not develop an attack in that month until they develop two attacks. We
      will then use a single-subject alternating treatments design with subjects receiving in
      random order two 3-month courses of Rilonacept at 2.2 mg/kg (max 160 mg) by weekly SC
      injection and two 3-month courses of comparable volume placebo. Subjects will continue the
      usual colchicine dose they were on when they started the study. Subjects with 2 acute FMF
      attacks during a treatment course will be able to crossover to the other treatment arm until
      the end of that treatment course. There will be 10 study visits: 1. Screening. 2. Treatment
      baseline after one month or after subjects have developed FMF attacks as described above.
      After 1 month of each treatment course and at the end of each treatment course (overall 8
      visits). At each visit subjects will return completed diary forms, used and unused drug,
      queried on adverse effects, undergo a physical examination and laboratory tests obtained for
      inflammation, safety and in some visits for translational studies. Subjects will also fill
      out quality of life questionnaires and give an overall estimation of the disease activity.
      Results will be analyzed by traditional frequency statistics (using an intent to treat
      analysis) and by Bayesian hierarchical modeling. Our primary aim is to assess the efficacy of
      Rilonacept in decreasing the number of acute FMF attacks while monitoring drug safety.

      The significance of the study includes short and long-term benefits. Fewer FMF attacks will
      result in less functional impairment and a higher quality of life in colchicine resistant or
      intolerant patients. Once weekly injections have the potential to improve treatment
      compliance. Fewer acute attacks of arthritis may prevent the development of chronic joint
      damage. In the long-term, better FMF control may prevent amyloidosis. This study may confirm
      the importance of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of FMF and provide support for an FDA filing for
      use of Rilonacept in FMF. The study design may serve as a template for trials of new biologic
      drugs for rare diseases.
    

Study Phase

Phase 2

Study Type

Interventional


Primary Outcome

To Assess the Efficacy of Rilonacept in Decreasing the Number of Acute FMF Attacks.

Secondary Outcome

 To Determine the Difference in the Length of Attacks During Treatment With Rilonacept vs. Placebo.

Condition

Familial Mediterranean Fever

Intervention

Rilonacept

Study Arms / Comparison Groups

 1
Description:  Treatment Arm A: Rilonacept (IL-1 Trap) at a dose of 2.2 mg/kg/wk (max 160 mg)given by subcutaneous injection for 3 months plus colchicine at a stable dose for those subjects already taking colchicine, or without colchicine for those intolerant or non-compliant with colchicine. Since the colchicine dose is stable throughout the study for each subject, at the prestudy dose, colchicine was not considered an intervention

Publications

* Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by National Clinical Trials Identifier (NCT ID) in Medline.

Recruitment Information


Recruitment Status

Drug

Estimated Enrollment

14

Start Date

August 2008

Completion Date

September 2011

Primary Completion Date

September 2011

Eligibility Criteria

        Inclusion Criteria:

          -  Subject has a definitive diagnosis of FMF as by the Tel-Hashomer clinical criteria
             (long version of criteria) with at least one mutation on one of the MEFV gene alleles.
             However, subjects with an isolated heterozygous mutation of exon 2 of the MEFV gene
             (including E148Q) will not be eligible.

          -  Subject must have an estimated mean of at least one acute FMF attack per month before
             and during the month of screening.

          -  Subject is at least four years of age (with no upper limit of age).

          -  Subjects must have received an adequate trial of colchicine defined as treatment of at
             least 1.5 mg/d for at least 3 months if ≥6 years old or 1.2 mg/d if less than 6 years,
             or an inability to tolerate colchicine due to adverse effects in a dose that controls
             acute attacks in the frequency of less than one attack per month.

          -  If subject is being treated with anakinra at the time of consent, washout must be done
             (about 3 days). Subject must experience 2 attacks before randomization visit can
             occur.

          -  If subject has been treated previously with anti-TNF drugs, appropriate washout must
             be done. Etanercept must be discontinued for 4 weeks prior to randomization;
             Adalimumab and Infliximab must be discontinued for 8 weeks prior to randomization.

          -  If subject is a female of childbearing potential, she must agree to use adequate
             contraception (adequate contraception can include abstinence) for the duration of the
             trial and 3 months after and must have a negative serum or urine pregnancy test prior
             to administration of study medication.

          -  If subject is a male and has reached puberty, he must agree to use adequate
             contraception or abstinence during the study and for 3 months after discontinuation
             from study.

          -  Subject's parent or legal guardian has provided written informed consent prior to
             screening for this study or if subject is older than 18 years has provided informed
             consent him/herself.

          -  Subject, if applicable, has assented to participate prior to screening for this study.

          -  Subject and, if applicable, parent/legal guardian, agree to comply with study
             requirements and are able to come to the clinic for all required study visits.

        Exclusion Criteria:

          -  The subject has existing biopsy proven amyloidosis or proteinuria >0.5 gram per day.

          -  The subject has another active inflammatory rheumatic disease.

          -  The subject has an active malignancy of any type, or history of a malignancy.

          -  The subject has active GI disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease), a chronic or
             acute renal or hepatic disorder, or a significant coagulation defect.

          -  The subject has an AST (SGOT), ALT (SGPT) or BUN >2 x ULN or creatinine >1.5 mg/dL or
             any other laboratory abnormality considered by the examining physician to be
             clinically significant within 28 days before the Baseline visit.

          -  Current use of an anti-tumor necrosis factor drug.

          -  The subject has, in the investigator's opinion, a chronic condition (e.g., diabetes,
             epilepsy) that is either not stable or well-controlled and may interfere with the
             conduct of the study.

          -  The subject has received any investigational medication within 30 days before the
             first dose of study medication or is scheduled to receive an investigational drug,
             other than study medications described in this protocol, during the course of the
             study.

          -  The subject has chronic or active infection or any major episode of infection
             requiring hospitalization or treatment with i.v. antibiotics within 30 days or oral
             antibiotics within 14 days prior to the screening evaluation.

          -  The subject has known positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status.

          -  The subject has known past or current hepatitis.

          -  The subject has received a live virus vaccine within 1 month prior to the baseline
             visit.

          -  The subject has a positive PPD test.

          -  The subject is sexually active and not practicing effective birth control.

          -  The subject is pregnant or breast feeding a child.

          -  Any concurrent medical condition which would, in the investigator's opinion,
             compromise the subject's ability to tolerate the study drug or would make the subject
             unable to cooperate with the protocol.

          -  History of/or current psychiatric illness that would interfere with ability to comply
             with protocol requirements or give informed consent.

          -  Subject has a history of alcohol or drug abuse within the past 6 months that would
             interfere with ability to comply with protocol requirements.

          -  Inability to comply with the study requirements for any reason.
      

Gender

All

Ages

4 Years - N/A

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

No

Contacts

Philip J Hashkes, MD, MSc, , 

Location Countries

United States

Location Countries

United States

Administrative Informations


NCT ID

NCT00582907

Organization ID

1R01FD003435-01

Secondary IDs

FDA 1RO1FD003435-01

Responsible Party

Principal Investigator

Study Sponsor

The Cleveland Clinic


Study Sponsor

Philip J Hashkes, MD, MSc, Study Director, Shaare Zedek Medical Center/The Cleveland Clinic Foundation


Verification Date

February 2013